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News & Reviews

21 Jul
2017

The Mediterranean diet. Presented by Professor Catherine Itsiopoulos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The health benefits of the Mediterranean diet cannot be ignored. At this point in time we know the Mediterranean diet is beneficial for; cardiovascular disease, mental health, insulin resistance, NAFLD and asthma.

Catherine was able to outline the current international research into the Mediterranean diet, including important trials within Australia. She also explained the practical aspects of the diet; what the key ingredients are and how to implement it.

 

 

03 Jul
2017

Making and using fermented foods. Presented by Sharon Flynn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A healthy gut microbiome has a huge diversity of bacteria. But how do we increase the diversity of bacteria in our gut? The answer lies with eating small amounts of different fermented foods each day. And as Sharon explained in her webinar, fermented foods are simple to prepare and taste delicious.

“Those pickles you buy from the shop aren’t fermented. They are preserved and they are tasty, which is great. But they are pretty much devoid of life because they are preserved in vinegar, and heated to kill any life that may make them dangerous. Buy those, and make those, but don’t pretend they are the same as wild brine ferment. They aren’t. And the flavour is very different.” From Ferment For Good by Sharon Flynn by Hardie Grant Books.

Sharon explains what fermentation is, discusses health benefits and different types of starter cultures, and shows how easy it is to make delicious fermented foods at home.  You will become familiar with scobies, kombucha, kefir, tempeh, labne and sauerkraut, just to name a few.

About the presenter:

Sharon Flynn has been learning, experimenting and honing her knowledge about fermented foods for several decades.

She has started The Fermentary (in Daylesford, Victoria) where she produces slow fermented vegetables and kefirs as well as running workshops teaching people how to make their own. Sharon is the author of “Ferment for Good: ancient food for the modern gut,” a guide to discovering the joys of fermentation. May 2017 Hardie Grant Books.

For more information and to register click here

16 Jun
2017

The brain-gut axis. Presented by Dr Simon Knowles BA (Hons) MPsyc (Clinical), PhD, MAPS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Simon Knowles is a Registered Clinical Psychologist and Senior Lecturer at Swinburne University.  His fascinating presentation explains to us what the brain-gut axis is and how it works, and identifies the links between psychological issues and chronic gastro-intestinal disorders such as IBS and IBD.  

Psychological issues and chronic GI conditions go hand in hand.  75% of people with IBS have a psychological disorder, such as stress, anxiety or depression.  It is important for us as dietitians that when we see clients with chronic GI conditions, as well as looking for dietary triggers we must also identify and address the psychological component of their illness.  Simon guides us as to when psychological interventions should be considered and what are appropriate psychological interventions for each client.

About the presenter; Dr Simon Knowles BA (Hons) MPsyc (Clinical), PhD, MAPS.  His clinical specialty is with people who have chronic gastro-intestinal illnesses.  He has three websites which provide free online psychological services for people with gut disorders.

IBDclinic.org.au

IBSclinic.org.au

gastroparesisclinic.org

 

For more information and to register for the webinar and associated documents click here

06 Jun
2017

Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. (NAFLD). Presented by Dr Alex Hodge, BSc, MBBS (Hons), PhD, FRACP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NAFLD is an exceedingly common and very serious disease.  An authority on research into this field is Dr Alexander Hodge from Monash Health.  Alex has a PhD in stem cell therapy for chronic liver diseases and lifestyle modifications for fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome.

Alex outlines how changes in diet and lifestyle since Palaeolithic times have contributed to the increase in NAFLD.   He talks us through the range of medical tests used to diagnose it and their accuracies, and discusses its links to type 2 diabetes, metabolic disorder, and liver diseases such as cirrhosis, and liver cancer.

As well as the latest in pharmaceutical clinical trials, Alex discusses research on how lifestyle interventions such as a higher plant based diet, weight loss and increased physical activity can help your clients decrease or even rid themselves of liver fat to greatly improve their overall health.

 

About the presenter – Dr Alex Hodge, MBBS (Hons), BSc, PhD is a consultant at Monash Health in gastroenterology and clinical nutrition.  He is Principal investigator on Pharmaceutical Clinical Trials for NAFLD.

To register for the webinar recording and associated documents click here

 

 

02 Jun
2017

Food Regulation. Presented by Louise Fisher, APD, BCom/LLB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As a dietitian, have you ever looked at a food product and wondered what laws govern the information on the package?  Louise Fisher provides us with a really clear understanding of food and nutrition regulation by explaining the three principles of food law;

1. Food Safety.

2. Competition and Consumer Protection.

3. Nutrition and Health claims.

She deciphers the information on food labels and explains how manufacturers gain compliance with the Food Standards Code (what’s compulsory information) and Australian Consumer Law (what they legally can or cannot claim).

Louise also discusses the ACCCs role and cites some fascinating court cases.

Most importantly, she outlines what this all means for the future of Food Regulation in Australia and how to use these laws to advocate for better nutrition and empower you as a dietician to help your clients make better food choices.

About the author – Louise Fisher is an APD and the founder of Food 360, an organisation which provides regulatory advice to companies in the complex area of food labelling. 

For more information and to register click here:

11 May
2017

Binge eating disorder. Presented by Dr Kiera Buchanan, Clinical and Health Psychologist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Binge eating disorder is a mental health disorder with diagnostic criteria outlined in the latest Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

Kiera advises that anyone presenting to you for weight loss or has concerns about their eating or their weight/shape should be screened for an eating disorder. Only one third of clients with eating disorders are asked about their eating behaviours/cognitions from their health professional.

The goals of treatment for binge eating disorder are:

Abstinence from binge eating
Reduce the over evaluation of shape and weight
Weight stabilisation and/or modest weight loss

Recovery from binge eating disorder is possible. Using CBT there is complete remission in around 50% of all clients. In her presentation Kiera outlined the practical strategies to use in CBT.

About the presenter:

Dr Kiera Buchanan is registered as both a Clinical and Health Psychologist and is the founding director of the Brisbane-based Centre for Integrative Health. Her research has focused on eating behavior, weight management and body image. She has acquired an expertise in helping clients achieve long-term solutions to their weight- and eating-issues through application of her research and experience. Dr Buchanan’s approach acknowledges the important relationship between diet, lifestyle, and psychological factors in achieving eating and weight-management outcomes. 

For more information and to register for the Binge eating disorder webinar recording and associated documents click here.

 

26 Apr
2017

Nutrition and breast cancer. Presented by Dr Michelle Harvie, PhD, Research Dietitian, UK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Michelle Harvie is a research dietitian from the Genesis Breast Cancer Prevention Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester. Her research and passion involve the investigation of optimal diet and exercise strategies to prevent breast cancer and its recurrence.

Michelle has written more than 40 peer-reviewed publications and was awarded the British Dietetic Association Rose Simmonds Award in 2005 for her paper on weight gain among breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. She received the National Association for the Study of Obesity National Best Practice Award in 2010 for her work on intermittent energy restricted diets. She is principal investigator for the B-AHEAD-2 trial and B-AHEAD 3 trials testing intermittent diets among early and advanced breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

By analysing the data available from published studies, Michelle explained in her presentation the links between survival after breast cancer with regard to:

Body weight
Physical activity
Fruit and vegetables
Soy
Dairy
Dietary fat
Vitamin supplements

For more information and to register for the Nutrition and breast cancer webinar recording and associated documents click here.

 

 

19 Apr
2017

Intermittent fasting. Presented by Dr Michelle Harvie, PhD, Research Dietitian, UK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Michelle Harvie is a research dietitian from the Genesis Breast Cancer Prevention Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester. Her research and passion involve the investigation of optimal diet and exercise strategies to prevent breast cancer and its recurrence.

Harvie’s group in Manchester conducted one of the first human studies into intermittent fasting (IF) in 2012.

Several years on, Michelle continues her research into IF. She recently published a review of the potential benefits and harms of intermittent energy restriction. For us, she has presented clearly the details about what is known regarding these very popular diets. To date in published research only 117 people have been studied using intermittent fasting diets. Incredibly, there are over 1000 diet books expounding the benefits of intermittent fasting.

The situation so far is that intermittent energy restriction, when compared to continuous energy restriction, has equal results with regards to weight loss, hepatic fat, insulin sensitivity and resting energy expenditure. We don’t know the long-term effects of IF. It does not appear to be a fad and it does seem that some people are managing to use IF to manage their weight. 

 

About the presenter:

Dr Michelle Harvie is a research dietitian from the Genesis Breast Cancer Prevention Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester. She qualified as a dietitian in 1991. Her current research covers optimum diet and exercise strategies to prevent breast cancer and its recurrence. She has written more than 40 peer-reviewed publications and was awarded the British Dietetic Association Rose Simmonds Award 2005 for her paper on weight gain among breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. She received the National Association for the Study of Obesity National Best Practice Award in 2010 for her work on intermittent energy restricted diets. She is principal investigator for the B-AHEAD-2 trial and B-AHEAD 3 trials testing intermittent diets among early and advanced breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Dr Harvie has published three self-help guides to the intermittent diet:  The 2 Day Diet (Ebury, Feb 2013); The 2 Day Diet Cookbook (Ebury, April 2013) and The 2 Day Diet: The Quick And Easy Edition (Ebury, Feb 2014). All author proceeds go to the Genesis Breast Cancer Prevention charity

For more information and to register for the Intermittent fasting webinar recording and associated documents click here.

 

 

28 Mar
2017

Nutrition and Ramadan. Presented by Lina Breik, APD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Islamic month of Ramadan, which varies from year to year, is a time during which many Muslim people abstain from eating, drinking and smoking from dawn to sunset. Fasting becomes an important act of faith for Muslim people all over the world in order to practice important life skills, including discipline, self-restraint and empathy.

Using the most current research and her personal experience, Lina explains Ramadan so we have a greater cultural awareness and can support our Muslim clients with suitable nutrition information.

This year Ramadan begins on Friday May 26th. Now is the perfect time to be asking your Muslim clients about their plans for Ramadan. Lina suggests that people with chronic illnesses and those with diabetes would benefit from a visit to their GP 1-2 months prior to the commencement of Ramadan to discuss how they will manage their fasting.

About the presenter:

Lina is a Palestinian-Australian Accredited Practicing Dietitian from Melbourne. While her clinical speciality is critical care nutrition, she thoroughly enjoys raising awareness around the importance of nutrition during religious festivities. As a Muslim clinician, Lina aims to help colleagues understand the Middle Eastern culture and Islamic religion better; and feel confident in connecting and empathising with their patients.

Further reading: Salti I, et al. A Population-Base study of Diabetes and Its Characteristics During the Fasting Month of Ramadan in 13 Countries (EPIDAR). Diabetes Care. 2004; 27(10):2306-11

Lina has created a practical resource to use with your clients in both English and Arabic:
Nutrition and Ramadan patient handout in English

Nutrition and Ramadan patient handout in Arabic

For more information and to register for the Nutrition and Ramadan webinar recording and associated documents click here.

23 Mar
2017

Bariatric surgery part 2: Diet, nutrition and common issues. Presented by Merril Bohn, APD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In her second webinar Merril addressed the prevention of complications after bariatric surgery. These included appropriate nutritional supplementation, maladapted eating and weight regain.

Merril also looked at the specific management of clients who become pregnant after bariatric surgery.

Recommended reading is the latest clinical practice guideline update for bariatric surgery. It can assist with routine and difficult clinical decision-making.

About the presenter:

Merril Bohn is an APD and has been working in the area of Bariatric surgery for over 25 years. She has extensive experience in the area of gastric bands, sleeve gastrectomy and Roux- En-Y gastric bypass. Merril was the first Allied Health dietitian representative on the Obesity Surgery Society of Australia and NZ executive and has been instrumental in establishing both a networking and clinical program at the obesity surgery society conferences. Merril is a sought after speaker on bariatric nutrition and an active member of the health behaviour and weight management DAA Interest group.

For more information and to register for the Bariatric surgery Part 2 webinar recording and associated documents click here.

09 Mar
2017

Bariatric surgery part 1: Understanding the basics. Presented by Merril Bohn, APD

 

 

 

 

 

Obesity is a complex condition and statistically most treatment plans are generally ineffective.

In her first webinar Merril gave an update on the procedures available in Australia and which are currently being done.

Merril presented the best practice recommendations for diet pre and post operatively and eating strategies for long term success.

She also explained why surgery is not a miracle cure for obesity. People who have had bariatric surgery require long-term lifestyle changes. Changes which dietitians are well positioned to educate and support them with.

About the presenter:

Merril Bohn is an APD and has been working in the area of Bariatric surgery for over 25 years. She has extensive experience in the area of gastric bands, sleeve gastrectomy and Roux- En-Y gastric bypass. Merril was the first Allied Health dietitian representative on the Obesity Surgery Society of Australia and NZ executive and has been instrumental in establishing both a networking and clinical program at the obesity surgery society conferences. Merril is a sought after speaker on bariatric nutrition and an active member of the health behaviour and weight management DAA Interest group.

For more information and to register for the Bariatric surgery Part 1 webinar recording and associated documents click here.

24 Feb
2017

Malnutrition assessment and nutritional diagnosis presented by Professor Liz Isenring, AdvAPD, PhD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liz explained in part 1 of her two part series on malnutrition, malnutrition screening is essential in determining who is at risk of malnutrition. In part 2 Liz goes on to describe the process of malnutrition assessment and nutritional diagnosis. As dietitians, nutritional assessment is our area. We have the expertise to carry out accurate and timely nutritional assessments. Our nutritional assessment provides important information for the management and treatment of patients and it reinforces our role as an essential part of the health care team.

Liz has high regard for Maggie Beer and her foundation and the important work they are doing. The aim of the foundation is to inspire and challenge chefs and cooks in aged care homes to create wholesome, memorable, low cost meals, every day in their kitchens.

As further reading, Liz suggests the ESPEN guidelines on nutrition in cancer patients. They provide current recommendations for identifying, preventing, and treating reversible elements of malnutrition in adult cancer patients.

Arends J, Bachmann P, Baracos V, Barthelemy N, Bertz H, Bozzetti F, Fearon K, Hütterer E, Isenring E, et.al , ESPEN guidelines on nutrition in cancer patients. Clinical Nutrition 2017 (36); 11-48

About the presenter:

Professor Liz isenring is the head of the new Nutrition and Dietetics programs at Bond University, Queensland. She is a leading nutrition and dietetics academic, an Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian and has previously worked at the University of Queensland, Flinders University and Queensland University of Technology. Professor Isenring is internationally recognised in the areas of oncology nutrition, nutrition in older adults, nutrition screening and assessment. Professor Isenring has led the development, and contributed to several sets of Australian and international evidence-based guidelines leading to improved nutrition care.

Professor Isenring has had over 100 peer-reviewed articles published and is regularly asked to submit invited-journal articles and editorials, and present at conferences around the world.

For more information and to register for the Malnutrition Part 2 webinar recording and associated documents click here.

 

 

24 Feb
2017

Malnutrition screening presented by Professor Liz Isenring, AdvAPD, PhD

 

 

 

 

 

People who are malnourished have a poorer quality of life, are admitted more frequently to hospital, stay longer and are more likely to die.

There is no topic which is more relevant to dietitians than malnutrition. But identifying and treating malnutrition can be difficult. Screening is the first step in identifying people who are either malnourished or at risk of malnourishment.  As Liz explained in her webinar, malnutrition screening is essential. There are now half a dozen evidence-based screening tools which work well. Liz’s’ message is clear- when it comes to malnutrition screening- choose a reliable tool and just do it!

About the presenter:

Professor Liz Isenring is the head of the new Nutrition and Dietetics programs at Bond University, Queensland. She is a leading nutrition and dietetics academic, an Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian and has previously worked at the University of Queensland, Flinders University and Queensland University of Technology. Professor Isenring is internationally recognised in the areas of oncology nutrition, nutrition in older adults, nutrition screening and assessment. Professor Isenring has led the development, and contributed to several sets of Australian and international evidence-based guidelines leading to improved nutrition care.

Professor Isenring has had over 100 peer-reviewed articles published and is regularly asked to submit invited-journal articles and editorials, and present at conferences around the world.

The following paper, although published in 2009, still remains excellent reading:

Watterson C, Fraser A, Banks M, Isenring E, Miller M, Silvester C, Hoevnaars R, Bauer J, Vivanti A, Ferguson  M. (2009) Evidence based practice guidelines for the nutritional management of malnutrition in adult patients across the continuum of care. Nutrition and Dietetics; 66 (Suppl 3): S1-S34

For more information and to register for the Malnutrition Part 1 webinar recording and associated documents click here.

 

 

22 Feb
2017

FREE Sustainable food as a health issue. By Dr Clare Pettinger and Liz Atherton, UK Dietitians

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The food we eat and the way it is produced directly impacts the environment and our health. As dietitians we are in a unique position to be promoting sustainable dietary patterns.

Liz Atherton explained the challenges posed by our current globalised food system.

  • Malnutrition affects one out of three people globally
  • Over one billion people who work in agriculture live below the poverty line
  • Accountable for 20-30% human produced greenhouse gas emissions
  • Major driver of deforestation, biodiversity loss, water use and pollution...
  • Farming systems contribute to antibiotic resistance

 

Dr Clare Pettinger provided practical strategies so that we can move from thinking about sustainability to engaging and promoting sustainability in our practice.

She focused on three areas:

1. As individuals,

Improve our own knowledge
Network with other dietitians who are interested in the area
Role model sustainable practice
Think about sustainability beyond food

2. As a dietetic profession

 Lobby for change in policy & legislation
Provide innovative leadership and direction
Work with others cross-sector partnerships

3. Up skilling as educators.

Review curriculum design and professional standards of education with regard to sustainability and food equality
Extend remit of evidence based practice. We need to change now. We don’t always need to wait for the studies.
Use our CPD to upskill in the issues and share our learning

About the Presenters

Dr Clare Pettinger is a Registered Dietitian, Public Health Nutritionist and experienced lecturer. She has an interest in food justice and the 'future of food' and is currently leading a research project 'Food as a Lifestyle Motivator' (FLM), which explores creative methods to engage 'marginalized' communities in food activities to enhance their health, well-being and life skills.

Clare is an inspired and informed educator and dedicated 'sustainability champion', currently leading pioneering research to ‘explore the importance of ‘sustainability principles’ for dietetic practice and how to streamline these into the dietetic curriculum’. Clare believes strongly that new approaches are required to tackle current local and global health and social wellbeing challenges.

 

Elizabeth Atherton:

Elizabeth is a registered dietitian and has a masters in public health. She currently works at Medact, a global public health charity, as the Sustainable Food Systems, Diets and Health Project Manager. This involves developing and implementing a set of four inter-connected projects aimed at promoting healthy, sustainable and ethical food systems, as well as reducing levels of unhealthy and unsustainable meat and dairy consumption.

To register for this free recording click here

27 Jan
2017

Exercise and type 1 diabetes presented by Dr Carmel Smart, APD, PhD

 

 

 

 

 

People with type 1 diabetes, in general, exercise less than people without diabetes. This is thought to be due to a very real fear of hypoing.

Exercise for people with type 1 diabetes is important, but it is a challenge to manage. Dietitians are in an ideal position to be able to support our clients with type 1 diabetes exercise confidently.

Carmel explained the different effects that aerobic and anaerobic exercise commonly have on blood glucose levels. She detailed three crucial aspects of management of blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes when they are exercising. Firstly, careful BGL monitoring. Secondly, appropriate adjustment of insulin for planned exercise. Thirdly, carbohydrate portions required to provide energy for exercise and keep BGL’s in target range.

About the presenter:

Dr Carmel Smart is a paediatric specialist diabetes dietitian at the John Hunter Children’s Hospital, Newcastle, and holds a conjoint senior position with the University of Newcastle. In 2016 she was awarded a Clinical Research Fellowship to support translation of her research into clinical practice.

She is highly respected internationally in the field of paediatric and adolescent type 1 diabetes. Carmel is the lead author of two international guidelines on the management of type 1 diabetes.

1. Nutritional management in children and adolescents with diabetes, a chapter published in the International Society for Paediatric and Adolescent Diabetes Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines 2014 Compendium

2. Exercise management in type 1 diabetes: a consensus statement. The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, Published Online January 23, 2017

 A two minute coversation with Carmel after the webinar

For more information about Carmel's webinar on exercise and type 1 diabetes or to register for a recording click here

You may also be interested in the other webinars Carmel has presented for us on type 1 diabetes:

Nutritional management of type 1 diabetes in children

Meal-time insulin dosing in type 1 diabetes – beyond

26 Jan
2017

FREE Mindful Eating presented by Sallyanne Pisk, APD

 

 

 

 

 

Eating mindfully helps us enjoy a healthy and happy relationship with food.

And by becoming more mindful in our day, we can become more mindful in what we eat.

Sallyanne explained the origins of mindfulness and some of the benefits of mindfulness in day-to-day life;

  • Increased self awareness of thoughts and actions
  • Improved focus and concentration
  • Less stress arising from negative thoughts and feelings
  • Increased compassion towards self and others
  • Increased ability to introduce choices that support health and wellbeing
  • Decreased blood pressure

Sallyanne guided us through a mindful eating practice. This is a practise she recommends performing at some time each day.

The presentation is suitable for dietitians who can use it as a learning tool for themselves and their clients. Sallyanne’s PowerPoint presentation is available with the recording.

The Mindful Eating recording is also suitable for a general audience. Anyone watching Mindful Eating will pick up practical mindful eating tips.

It was wonderful to have Sallyanne share her knowledge in mindfulness and mindful eating and hopefully inspire us to give it a go!

About the presenter:

Sallyanne is an Accredited Practising Dietitian and mindfulness practitioner who takes a total lifestyle approach to health and wellbeing. Over the past 20 years she has worked in a range of health care settings, including tertiary hospitals, health retreats and integrative medical centres. Sallyanne draws on her experience as a health manager, researcher and practitioner to integrate Western and Eastern nutrition principles. Sallyanne’s interest in traditional Chinese medicine began more than 15 years ago. Since then, due to frequent visits to Nepal and India, she has cultivated an appreciation for Ayurveda and Tibetan medicine. Sallyanne and her husband support a remote Tibetan community in Nepal in the development of their health services. These experiences are the basis for Sallyanne’s book Eating for You and her soon-to-be-released nutrition and lifestyle programs.

Sallyanne’s book Eating for You (2016) is available from her website www.eatingforyou.com.au

Special offer for Education in Nutrition followers: Use the code EdNut17 at the checkout for free postage in Australia.

To download Sallyanne's free presentation click here. There will be no charge applied at the checkout.

 

02 Dec
2016

Eat to cheat dementia Presented by Ngaire Hobbins, APD

 

 

 

 

 

There are more than 353,800 Australians living with dementia. This number is expected to increase to 400,000 in less than five years. The good news is that lifestyle can have an effect not only on the prevention of dementia but also in aiding the maintenance of health so the disease progression is slowed.

In her presentation Ngaire looks in detail at the brain changes which occur prior to a diagnosis of dementia and dietary strategies which could potentially protect against these changes. As we all know, adequate protein intake in older people can be challenging. The reduction of muscle mass is a significant risk factor for dementia, a combination of reduced physical activity and an inadequate protein intake.

Ngaire explains that eating for brain health differs depending on age. For younger adults the most current health messages are fine - anything that supports cardiac health also supports brain health. But for older adults, weight loss, reduced physical activity and inadequate protein can worsen both cognitive and physical health.

Ngaires message is not anti-ageing, it is about ageing well.

About the presenter:

Ngaire is an experienced dietitian who, for more than 30 years, has enjoyed a variety of roles, including food industry consulting, nutrition communications and community and clinical dietetics. A time spent in community care some years ago led into geriatrics, an area of nutrition about which she has developed a passion. After the success of her first book Eat to Cheat Ageing (2014), Ngaire has recently published a follow-up, Eat to Cheat Dementia (2016). This book examines what we can do to reduce our chances of cognitive decline and dementia, and also provides nutritional information for those living with a dementia diagnosis and the people who care about them.

To purchase Ngaire's webinar Eat to cheat dementia and associated documents click here

 

25 Nov
2016

Nutritional management of upper gastrointestinal surgery Presented by Dr Sharon Carey, PhD, APD

 

 

 

 

 

Nutrition management of Upper GI surgical patients is multifaceted.

Our clients move from diagnosis into the perioperative then post-operative periods. They are then faced with the issues involved in long-term management, and unfortunately often into palliative care. However, at every stage nutrition can play a major part in improving clinical outcomes and quality of life for this patient group. Sharon explained our extremley important role in the management of people requiring upper GI surgery

About the presenter:

Dr Sharon Carey is Head of Nutrition and Dietetics at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney she is a Gastrointestinal Specialist Dietitian and Adjunct Senior Lecturer at the University of Sydney. She has had more than 10 years’ experience in the area of gastroenterology and has a specific interest in major gastrointestinal surgery including intestinal failure. In 2008 she was awarded a Churchill Scholarship for her work in the nutritional management of intestinal failure. Sharon completed her PhD through the University of Sydney in 2013, which involved an in-depth look at the long-term nutritional consequences of major upper gastrointestinal surgeries, and the impact the surgery has on quality of life.

Sharon presented two webinars for us in 2016 on the Nutritional management of upper gastrointestinal surgery and the Nutritional management of stomas.

In February she will return with a presentation on TPN: the basics.

To purchase Sharon’s presentation on upper GI surgery and associated documents click here

24 Nov
2016

The International Dysphagia Diet Standard Initiative by Peter Lam, Co-chair IDDSI, Dietitian, Canada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IDDSI is coming to Australia

The International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative (IDDSI) has produced standardised terminology to describe texture-modified foods and thickened liquids. It can be used for individuals with dysphagia of all ages, in all care settings and all cultures. The IDDSI Framework is recommended for implementation throughout the world.

The IDDSI framework was developed in consultation with people from 57 countries and has been well received by the international community.

At their November meetings, the Speech Pathologists Association and Dietitians Association of Australia have ratified the decision to endorse and implement the IDDSI framework in Australia.

The final IDDSI framework consists of eight levels (Levels 0–7) that are identified by numbers, text labels, and color codes.

Peter reassures us that transitioning to IDDSI will be easy!

The IDDSI web site provides up-to-date resources regarding the framework. These resources will help us transition over the next couple of years.

About the presenter:

Peter Lam is a Registered Dietitian in Vancouver, BC, Canada. He is the co-chair (with Julie Cichero, PhD, Speech Pathologist, Australia) of the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative.

You can read the latest article published in Dysphagia Dec 2016 which examines the Development of International Terminology and Definitions for Texture-Modified Foods and Thickened Fluids Used in Dysphagia Management: The IDDSI Framework here

To purchase the recorded webinar, suggested further reading and assessment questions click here

 

21 Nov
2016

Anorexia nervosa in adolescents Presented by Melissa Whitelaw, APD, PhD

 

 

 

 

 

Anorexia nervosa is a serious and potentially life threatening condition. As dietitians, there are few areas where we work in which our assessment and management is so critical. When we assess an adolescent we need to be aware of the possibility of an eating disorder or disordered eating. Due to the nature of the condition this is a difficult and confronting assessment to make. Melissa explains how to target questions to help ascertain if there is an issue and what we need to do to manage our client so they have the best chance of recovery.

About the presenter:

Melissa’s passion is with adolescents and adolescent health. Prior to becoming a dietitian, Melissa was a secondary school teacher for 25 years. She now specialises in the treatment of anorexia nervosa. Melissa has been the dietitian with the Department of Adolescent Medicine at Melbourne’s Royal Children’s Hospital for over 12 years and also consults at the Melbourne Children’s Clinic. She is currently undertaking a PhD at the University of Melbourne examining the clinical course of anorexia nervosa for adolescents who meet all diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa apart from weight.

Melissa has presented at national and international conferences and is the author of several papers about adolescent eating disorders published in international journals.

To purchase a recording of the webinar and associated documents click here